WPATH Responds to Trump Administration Memo

On October 21, 2018, the New York Times published “’Transgender’ Could Be Defined Out of Existence Under Trump Administration,” in which journalists Erica L. Green, Katie Benner, and Robert Pear wrote that the “administration is considering narrowly defining gender as a biological, immutable condition determined by genitalia at birth, the most drastic move yet in a governmentwide effort to roll back recognition and protections of transgender people under federal civil rights law. The press releases below, from WPATH and our US regional chapter, USPATH, present this Association’s immediate response. Further efforts will include preparing the scientific arguments to be delivered during the 60-day comment period once the new regulations are proposed in the Federal Register.

For Immediate Release

East Dundee, IL: October 23, 2018

WPATH Board Responds to Federal Effort to Redefine Gender

The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) Board of Directors expresses its strongest disagreement with the intention of the Trump administration to define human gender as the sex recorded at birth based on visible genital formation and to restrict changes, all via regulation. It has been known for decades that sex and gender cannot be determined solely by birth anatomy or chromosomes. More recently, the durable biological underpinnings for gender identity have become better understood within the mainstream medical and scientific communities. Further, the targeting of individuals or groups to deny medically-indicated care represents a violation of the professional oaths taken by us in the medical provider community.

The Trump administration’s past efforts to erase transgender people from American society indicate that its officials believe that XX or XY chromosomal testing to be definitive and definitional. However, this testing is insufficient to measure the known factors that affect the actual sex or gender of a sentient human being.

To acknowledge the diversity of sex and/or gender present in all human beings gives life and potential to those millions of people whose characteristics are not simply defined by sex chromosomes. Over the past 30 years, litigation throughout all levels of the US judicial system has proven time and again that human beings who are not reducible to chromosomes do deserve full equality, including access to employment, housing, public accommodations, education, and health care, along with all rights conferred by the US Constitution.

WPATH member physicians and researchers stand ready to testify before Congress to protect and defend the health and well-being of all transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

For Immediate Release

East Dundee, IL: October 22, 2018

USPATH Board Responds to Federal Effort to Redefine Sex/Gender

The United States Professional Association for Transgender Health (USPATH) Board of Directors expresses its strongest disagreement with the intention of the Trump administration to define human gender/sex as the sex recorded at birth based on visible genital formation. It has been known for decades that sex determination does not always correlate with birth anatomy or with chromosomes.  More recently, the biological basis of gender identity has become better understood within the mainstream medical and scientific communities.

As medical providers, we recognize that limiting equal protection with resulting discrimination in employment, housing, education, and/or public accommodation can have profound negative health impact.  Further, the targeting of individuals or groups to deny medically indicated care represents a violation of the professional oaths taken by us in the medical provider community.

USPATH member medical professionals and researchers stand ready to testify before Congress to protect and defend the health and well-being of all transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

Click Here To View on wpath.org

Rennovation Complete, We Welcome our First Scholar Visitor

Louise finally has her make-up on! The remodeling is complete. All the boxes are unpacked and everything is on the shelves, even if it’s not all on the right shelf, yet. This week & next Louise is hostess to her first researcher, Professor Julian Gill-Peterson of the University of Pittsburgh, who is exploring the grass-roots organizing of the early transgender community, 1940-1970.

Louise is open by appointment. Please visit when you’re in the neighborhood.

Just LOOK at how far we’ve come with the help of our generous donors!

Our Latest Acquisition

Louise just won an EBay auction, several pages from on old photo album, 70 or so snapshots with 20+ of cross dressing women.  We don’t have them, yet, and it’s difficult to see details, but there seem to be other queer images: 2 women dancing cheek-to-cheek,  woman down on one knee in front of another.  The body language says she’s proposing. Louise is beside herself.

Premiere of The Death and Life of Marsha P Johnson

Producers Sara Ramirez, LA Teodosio, Joy Tomchin and director David France discuss their film at the Piedmont theater in Oakland, CA. June 25th, 2017. Photo by Robyn Adams

We recently attended the Frameline Premiere of The Death and Life of Marsha P Johnson. As archivists we were blown away by the research the filmmakers did and the archival gems they unearthed.

They uncovered unseen footage of Marsha and Sylvia Rivera, including the full speech/rant that Sylvia gave at the 1973 NY gay freedom day when they were trying to minimize the queens. Sylvia plays a huge and heartbreaking role in the film.

The story of the re-investigation into Marsha’s death 20 years later touches on all the forces that work against these women even today, from the justice system, economic conditions, racism, class differences, transphobia, and the epidemic of murders of transwomen of color.

The documentary is set to stream on Netflix later this year and we are thrilled that such a large audience will be exposed to this transgender history. It inspires us to continue our work preserving and discovering our transgender past.